AL PANORAMA: VIAJES Y MAS –  New Zealand and Australia ...

AL PANORAMA: VIAJES Y MAS –  New Zealand and Australia Auckland, NZ

AL PANORAMA: VIAJES Y MAS

This month we travel to some parts of New Zealand and Australia

Auckland, NZ

The Māori call Auckland Tāmaki Makaurau — a maiden desired by 100 lovers, and a valuable territory fought over for centuries for its fertile land and natural harbors on the Pacific Ocean (to the east) and Tasman Sea (to the west). Today, it’s New Zealand’s largest city: A vibrant and diverse place where nature and urban life go hand-in- hand, with 48 volcanic cones, more than 50 islands, and 29,000 km of coastline and beaches just minutes away from the arts and shopping of the central city.

Auckland, based around 2 large harbours, is a major city in the north of New Zealand’s North Island. In the centre, the iconic Sky Tower has views of Viaduct Harbour, which is full of superyachts and lined with bars and cafes. Auckland Domain, the city’s oldest park, is based around an extinct volcano and home to the formal Wintergardens. Near Downtown, Mission Bay Beach has a seaside promenade.

Auckland has a huge range of attractions that you can explore for days or weeks.

This rather impressive Auckland fact is down to the position of the city between two natural harbors. Auckland has some truly amazing walks that the city has become renowned for, and a favorite is the Coast-to-Coast walk. It is a 16-kilometre walk starting at the Waitemata Harbour by the Pacific Ocean and ending at the Manukau Harbour by the Tasman Sea.

It may sound slightly scary, but don’t worry, these volcanoes are not expected to erupt again in this area. The volcanoes originated from a magma source which is located 100-kilometres under the city and have provided the city with some truly remarkable landscapes.

With a lot of land and a low population, it is unsurprising that the quality of life in New Zealand is quite high. People find that there is a more relaxed approach to life here and the people are friendlier for it.

Auckland is still continuously appreciated for the kiwi way of life.

Auckland is also known as the ‘City of Sails’

Positioned on a peninsula between the Waitemata and Manukau Harbour, Auckland is lucky to be home to wonderful waters with unbeatable landscapes and unique wildlife that frequently make it to the big screen. These picture perfect waters are also why Auckland is known as the world’s best city for yacht lovers. So even if you only visit Auckland to sail these waters, it certainly wouldn’t be a wasted journey.

If your tour is visiting Auckland, expect to meet some lovely Polynesian people. They make up around 28% of the Auckland population and invite the city and its visitors to enjoy their culture at the Otara markets and the yearly Pasifika festival.

Pop singer Lorde is the only New Zealander to top the US Charts since 1987 and is from Takapuna, Auckland.

Shortland Street is New Zealand’s longest running prime-time soap, following the lives of a medical team at Shortland Street Hospital. The show has been running for over 24 years with the city of Auckland as its home.

Auckland was the second city to become the capital before Wellington took the title, which it still has today. Auckland lost its role as the capital city because government officials travelling from the south found the journey too arduous, with a single trip taking up to two months.

The Maori name for Auckland is Tamaki Makaurau, which translates to ‘Tamaki with a hundred lovers”. This name was devised because of the desirability the land had with its fertile ground and versatile waterways.

The interesting city of Auckland offers so much to its visitors thanks to its fascinating landscapes and people. So, relax and enjoy this peaceful and serene city, because there really is nowhere else like it.

 

 

NAPIER, NZ

Napier, a coastal city on New Zealand’s North Island, is set amid the renowned wine-producing region of Hawke’s Bay. Rebuilt after a 1931 earthquake, the city is known for art deco landmarks like the zigzag-patterned Daily Telegraph Building. Along the tree-lined waterfront promenade the Marine Parade, the Pania of the Reef statue depicting a Maori maiden, is a symbol of the city.

Street after street of stunning and beautifully-restored Art Deco buildings have made Napier famous as one of the most complete collections of Art Deco buildings in the world. In 1931 a massive earthquake rocked Hawke’s Bay for more than three minutes, killing nearly 260 and destroying the commercial centre of Napier.

Rebuilding began almost immediately, and new buildings reflected the architectural styles of the times – Stripped Classical, Spanish Mission and Art Deco. Napier is often referred to as a 1930s film set, and one of the best ways to enjoy the streetscape is on a self-guided walk – ask for a map at the information centre or at the Art Deco Trust. Guided walks around the city are also available every day rain or shine (except Christmas Day!). Every February, Napier celebrates its heritage with the Art Deco Festival – a stylish celebration of all things 1930s, including vintage cars, fashion and music.

WELLINGTON, NZ

Wellington, the capital of New Zealand, sits near the North Island’s southernmost point on the Cook Strait. A compact city, it encompasses a waterfront promenade, sandy beaches, a working harbour and colourful timber houses on surrounding hills. From Lambton Quay, the iconic red Wellington Cable Car heads to the Wellington Botanic Gardens. Strong winds through the Cook Strait give it the nickname “Windy Wellington.”

Creative, well caffeinated and culinarily blessed, Wellington is surprisingly compact. The central area of New Zealand’s capital is just 2km across, which means it’s a cinch to get around on foot – you’re usually no more than a 10-minute stroll from the next place you want to be.

You’ll need every bit of exercise you can get to stoke your appetite: Wellington is packed with cool-as cafes, boutique food factories and exceptional restaurants. It also has craft beer, a couple of critically endangered old birds and a colossal squid. Yep, everything you want in a city break.

Wellington is the major population centre of the southern North Island, and is the administrative centre of the Wellington Region, which also includes the Kapiti Coast and the Wairarapa. It is the world’s southernmost capital of a sovereign state. Wellington features a temperate maritime climate, and is the world’s windiest city by average wind speed.

Wellington’s economy is primarily service-based, with an emphasis on finance, business services, and government. It is the centre of New Zealand’s film and special effects industries, and increasingly a hub for information technology and innovation, with two public research universities. Wellington is one of New Zealand’s chief seaports and serves both domestic and international shipping. The city is served by Wellington International Airport, the third busiest airport in the country.

You have to visit and explore this wonderful city.

 

 

AKAROA, NZ

The most French town in New Zealand, Akaroa will have you entranced with its historic buildings, magnificent harbour and passion for fine food.

 

An easy drive south-east of Christchurch, Banks Peninsula is the South Island’s most interesting volcanic feature. Originally an island formed by two volcanic cones, the peninsula has two dominant craters which form Lyttelton and Akaroa Harbours. The peninsula was named for botanist Joseph Banks, who sailed with Captain James Cook on the Endeavour.

Located on the south east side of the deep, sheltered Akaroa Harbour, the charming township of Akaroa has a special point of difference – it was the only French settlement in New Zealand.

In 1838 a French whaler, Captain Langlois, decided that Akaroa was an ideal location for a town that could service the whaling ships. He subsequently acquired the peninsula in a dubious land deal with the local Maori. He then returned to France and arranged for a group of French and German families to sail to New Zealand, with the intention of forming a French colony.

In spite of this unexpected turn of events, the French settlers decided to stay on. Akaroa’s French street names and charming colonial cottages are their legacy.

The best way to explore Akaroa is on foot. Begin at the information centre, which is on the corner of Rue Lavaud and Rue Balguerie. You’ll find brochures and maps that will help you to decide where to walk.

Visit local restaurants with their focus on French cuisine and head along to Barrys Bay Cheese, where they’ve persevered with original methods for over a century. During milking season, every second day, you can watch their award-winning cheeses being made through the gallery window.

Take a self-guided walk to see historic cottages. Be sure to visit the museum – it tells the story of Akaroa with displays and an audio visual presentation. If you have time, take a harbour cruise to view dolphins, penguins and fur seals.

 

DUNEDIN, NZ

Known as the Edinburgh of New Zealand, Dunedin is the country’s city of the south, wearing its Scottish heritage with pride. Surrounded by dramatic hills and at the foot of a long, picturesque harbour, Dunedin is one of the best-preserved Victorian and Edwardian cities in the Southern Hemisphere. The accommodation is good and plentiful; the nightlife buzzes with funky bars and delicious restaurants and the natural attractions are unique and fascinating.

Don’t miss a drive up the Otago Peninsula – the views are endless and the beaches are beautifully rugged. Nestled at the foot of Taiaroa Head is the Royal Albatross Centre, the only place in the world on the mainland where you can view Northern Royal Albatross in their natural habitat. On Dunedin’s doorstep you will also find incredible wildlife including the world’s rarest penguin colonies.

Head further south, and you join the Southern Scenic Route, a must-do of the South Island that follows the wild coast down to Invercargill and then north-west to Manapouri and Te Anau.

 

 

HOBBART, AUSTRALIA

Hobart is Tasmania’s capital city and the second oldest capital in Australia, after Sydney. Located at the entrance to the Derwent River, its well-preserved surrounding bushland reaches close to the city centre and beaches line the shores of the river and estuary beyond.

With its captivating history, picturesque waterways, rugged mountains and gourmet experiences, the city has something for everyone.

Award-winning restaurants offer fine dining experiences using the best Tasmanian produce recognised by the world’s best chefs, while on the waterfront punts and fishmongers sell the freshest seafood straight from the Southern Ocean.

Enjoy the contrast of elegant heritage sandstone alongside modern architecture. Explore Salamanca Place, a short walk from the waterfront, with its galleries, theatres, craft shops and restaurants in 1830s Georgian warehouses and on Saturdays enjoy the food and entertainment of Salamanca Market, Australia’s best outdoor market.

Take a walk along Hobart’s iconic waterfront, explore the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery or take a ferry up river to MONA for an out-of-this-world modern art experience.

It’s easy to fall for the many charms of this quietly buzzing city that hits fever pitch at festival time.

Hobart is also close to many of southern Tasmania’s best travel experiences, from historic Port Arthur and the rugged Tasman Peninsula to Bruny Island, the Huon and Derwent Valleys and Mount Field National Park.

 

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

From splendid Sydney Harbour, idyllic beaches and great national parks, to the marvellous creativity of the Sydney Opera House, dazzling entertainment and fascinating heritage, discover all the things to do and see throughout the year.

From romantic weekend getaways in rolling wine country to memorable beach holidays on the NSW coast, finding the perfect short trip from Sydney is easy. Discover delicious foodie experiences and thrilling adventure, as well as spectacular natural wonders and more.

One of the most beautiful cities in the world, the city fans out from the sparkling harbour to iconic Bondi Beach in the east, golden Palm Beach in the north, the adventure capital in the west and Australia’s oldest national park in the south. The Sydney Opera House is near Circular Quay.

From summer to autumn, and winter to spring, the city is wonderful to visit at any time of the year. In the heart of the city are world-class restaurants, grand shopping arcades and other top tourist attractions, including the Sea Life Sydney Aquarium’s king penguins, dugongs and sea dragons.

Is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia’s east coast, the metropolis surrounds Port Jackson and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions. Residents of the city are known as “Sydneysiders”. As of June 2017, Sydney’s estimated metropolitan population was 5,230,330 and is home to approximately 65% of the state’s population.

Indigenous Australians have inhabited the Sydney area for at least 30,000 years, and thousands of engravings remain throughout the region, making it one of the richest in Australia in terms of Aboriginal archaeological sites. During his first Pacific voyage in 1770, Lieutenant James Cook and his crew became the first Europeans to chart the eastern coast of Australia, making landfall at Botany Bay and inspiring British interest in the area.

Despite being one of the most expensive cities in the world, Sydney frequently ranks in the top ten of lists of the most livable cities in the world. It is classified as an Alpha+ World City by Globalization and World Cities Research Network, indicating its influence in the region and throughout the world. Ranked eleventh in the world for economic opportunity, Sydney has an advanced market economy with strengths in finance, manufacturing and tourism. There is a significant concentration of foreign banks and multinational corporations in Sydney and the city is promoted as Australia’s financial capital and one of Asia Pacific’s leading financial hubs.Established in 1850, the University of Sydney is Australia’s first university and is regarded as one of the world’s leading universities. Sydney is also home to the oldest library in Australia, State Library of New South Wales, opened in 1826.

Sydney is one of the coolest cities in the world, that is worth the visit !!!

 

Great walks in Sydney