Daily Archives: Dec 2, 2019

    La música que acompaña las navidades puertorriqueñas fueron la esencia del programa.

    El tradicional especial navideño del Banco Popular, que este año lleva por nombre Tiempos de Aguinaldo, fue transmitido esta noche por los principales canales locales.

    Las reuniones familiares, la comida, las tradiciones de esta época festiva y, por supuesto, la música que acompaña las navidades puertorriqueñas fueron la esencia del especial.

    Si te perdiste Tiempos de Aguinaldo, o lo quieres volver a ver, tendrás la oportunidad de disfrutarlo a través de YouTube hasta las 8:00 p.m. de mañana lunes, 2 de diciembre

    Tiempos de Aguinaldo reunió en la música al cantante Chucho Avellanet, quien no participaba de este proyecto desde el primero en 1965, los hermanos músicos Mónika y Christian Nieves, Juan Vélez, José Nogueras, Alfonso Vélez “el Fua”, Dayanira Arzuaga, Nano Cabrera, Fuete y José Nogueras, Willito Otero, Kiani Medina, Melina León, Lalo Rodríguez, Michael Stuart, Vico C, Lunay y Los Pleneros de Severo, entre otros.

    A partir de mañana lunes, el especial estará a la venta en todas las sucursales del Banco Popular. Una parte de los fondos recaudados con la venta de la producción audiovisual serán destinados a la Fundación Banco Popular, la cual sirve a escuelas y otras entidades con programas musicales.

     

      SOCHI, Russia (Reuters) – Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping on Monday oversaw the launch of a landmark pipeline that will transport natural gas from Siberia to northeast China, an economic and political boost to ties between Moscow and Beijing

      The start of gas flows via the Power of Siberia pipeline reflects Moscow’s attempts to pivot to the East to try to mitigate pain from Western financial sanctions imposed over its 2014 annexation of Ukraine’s Crimea.

      The move cements China’s spot as Russia’s top export market and gives Russia a potentially enormous new market outside Europe. It also comes as Moscow is hoping to launch two other major energy projects — the Nord Steam 2 undersea Baltic gas pipeline to Germany and the TurkStream pipeline to Turkey and southern Europe.

      The 3,000-km-long (1,865 mile) Power of Siberia pipeline will transport gas from the Chayandinskoye and Kovytka fields in eastern Siberia, a project expected to last for three decades and to generate $400 billion for Russian state coffers.

      “This is a genuinely historical event not only for the global energy market but above all for us, for Russia and China,” said Putin, who watched the launch via video link from the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi.

      “This step takes Russo-Chinese strategic cooperation in energy to a qualitative new level and brings us closer to (fulfilling) the task, set together with Chinese leader Xi Jinping, of taking bilateral trade to $200 billion by 2024.”

      The new pipeline emerges in Heilongjiang, which borders Russia, and goes onto Jilin and Liaoning, China’s top grain hub.

      Xi told Putin via a video link on Monday that the newly launched gas pipeline is “a landmark project of bilateral energy cooperation” and an “example of deep integration and mutually beneficial cooperation”.

      Flows via the pipeline are expected to gradually rise to 38 billion cubic metres (bcm) per year in 2025, possibly making China Russia’s second-largest gas customer after Germany, which bought 58.50 bcm of gas from Russia last year.

      Moscow began supplying natural gas to western and central Europe in the 1950s and Europe has long been Russia’s major consumer of gas, supplied by Kremlin-controlled energy giant Gazprom (GAZP.MM), with total annual supplies of around 200 bcm.

      The price China is paying for Russian gas in the new pipeline remains a closely kept secret with various industry sources saying it is tied to the price of an oil products basket.

      Neither Putin, nor Xi commented on Monday on the gas price Beijing is set to pay under the contract.

      INCREASED COMPETITION

      Russian pipeline gas will compete against other pipeline gas supplies to China, including from Turkmenistan, as well as against shipments of sea-borne liquefied natural gas (LNG).

      “China’s gas demand growth is expected to slow down from previous years yet remains strong, with an estimated 10% year-on-year growth for the first nine months of 2019,” Jean-Baptiste Dubreuil, from the International Energy Agency’s natural gas market analysis team, told Reuters.

      “Our medium term forecast ‘Gas 2019’ assumes average 8% growth until 2024 (compared with a world average of 1.6% pa).”

      Russia has been in talks with China about raising gas sales via other routes too, such as from the Russian Far East and via Mongolia or Kazakhstan, but has not yet clinched any deals.

      Russia has dramatically increased deliveries of oil to China in the past decade, challenging Saudi Arabia as China’s top oil supplier in certain months.

      To achieve that, Russia launched a major oil pipeline to China, which today ships 600,000 barrels per day (bpd), and opened a new port at Kozmino on the Pacific. Russia also ships 200,000 bpd to China via a pipeline crossing Kazakhstan.

      Russian coal sales to the east in 2018 exceeded 100 million tonnes, accounting for more than half of Russia’s total coal exports.

      Additional reporting by Katya Golubkova and Maria Kiselyova in Moscow; Writing by Vladimir Soldatkin/Andrew Osborn; editing by Andrew Osborn/Katya Golubkova/Christina Fincher

       

        AT SEA - AUGUST 13: In this handout photo provided by the U.S. Navy, a RIM-7P NATO Sea Sparrow Missile launches the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) during a stream raid shoot exercise on August 13, 2007 in the Pacific Ocean, At Sea. Lincoln's self-defense systems fired four Sea Sparrow missiles, engaging and destroying two BQM-74E turbojet-powered drone aircraft and a High-Speed Maneuvering Surface Threat (HSMST) remote controlled Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boat (RHIB) during the event. Lincoln and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 are underway off the coast of Southern California conducting Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA). (Photo by Jordon R. Beesley/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)

        TAIPEI (Reuters) – Taiwan invites U.S. military experts to visit to provide advice on bolstering the island’s defenses, the defense ministry said on Monday, in the face of what Taipei views as a growing threat from its giant neighbor China.

        Democratic Taiwan is claimed by China as part of its territory.

        China has never renounced the use of force to bring the island under its control, and has stepped up military activity around the island, including sailing an aircraft carrier group through the Taiwan Strait last month.

        Like most countries, the United States has no formal diplomatic ties with Taiwan, but is bound by law to provide the island with the means to defend itself and is its most important arms supplier.

        In a brief statement, Taiwan’s Defense Ministry said it plans to use the “arms purchase contract model to invite a U.S. expert group to come to Taiwan”.

        The ministry “hopes to use the U.S. military’s practical experience to provide a reference for the national armed forces’ construction and war preparations”.

        “This case is a Taiwan-U.S. military exchange and cooperation plan, which will help consolidate and deepen the security partnership between the two sides and further ensure peace and stability in the region,” it said.

        The ministry gave no other details, and did not specifically mention China, though the country is Taiwan’s only real military threat.

        The Trump administration has been stepping up its support for Taiwan, including approving $10 billion in arms sales this year, despite strong Chinese opposition.

        China, already locked in a trade war with the United States, regularly calls Taiwan the most sensitive and important issue in the Sino-U.S. relationship.

        Brent Christensen, the de facto U.S. ambassador to Taiwan, said last month that strengthening security ties was one of his priorities.

        While Taiwan’s military is well armed and well trained, China’s armed forces have long since gained the upper hand, with new missiles, stealth fighters, aircraft carriers and submarines coming into service at a steady rate.

        Most military experts believe Taiwan would only last a few days in a war with China, unless the United States came quickly to its aid, mobilizing its substantial forces in nearby Japan and maybe also South Korea.

        Reporting by Ben Blanchard, editing by Ed Osmond

          DUBAI/LONDON/MOSCOW (Reuters) – OPEC and its allies plan to deepen oil cuts and have the deal in place so it runs at least until June 2020 as Saudi Arabia wants to deliver a positive surprise to the market before the listing of Saudi Aramco, two sources familiar with the talks said

          The deal being discussed by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other producers, known as OPEC+, would add at least 400,000 barrels per day (bpd) to existing cuts of 1.2 million bpd or 1.2% of global supply.

          The current deal runs to March.

          “They (the Saudis) want to surprise the market,” one of the sources said.

          Another two sources said the latest OPEC analysis, drawn up by OPEC’s Economic Commission Board (ECB), showed a large oversupply and build up in inventories in the first half of 2020, if no additional cuts were made.

          Russia, a key non-OPEC ally, has so far opposed deeper cuts or a longer extension. But Moscow has often taken a tough stance before every meeting before approving the policy. Sources said Saudi Arabia was working on convincing Russia.

          Riyadh needs high oil prices to balance its budget and support the pricing for the Aramco initial public offering (IPO), which could be the world’s biggest.

          Russia, the world’s second biggest oil exporter after Saudi Arabia, also benefits from a higher oil price and has been working with OPEC on cuts to prevent an oil glut building as a result of booming production from the United States, which has climbed to become the world’s biggest crude producer.

          Benchmark Brent oil prices LCOc1 rose by more than 2% to nearly $62 per barrel on Monday on the news about the possibility of deeper cuts.

          Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman heads to Vienna this week for his first OPEC meeting as Saudi Arabia’s energy minister.

          SEEKING STRICTER COMPLIANCE

          The veteran oil official, known as a tough negotiator, wants to ensure oil prices stay high enough for Aramco’s IPO, sources said.

          The IPO will be priced on Thursday, the same day OPEC meets in Vienna. The OPEC+ grouping holds talks on Friday.

          Saudi officials, including Prince Abdulaziz, have insisted on stricter compliance with the current cuts, especially as countries such as Iraq and Nigeria have produced well above their quotas, while Riyadh has cut more than demanded.

          The Saudis are also lobbying other producers to deepen cuts and have been signaling that they are ready to continue taking the biggest burden and to cut well in excess of their target.

          Amrita Sen, co-founder of Energy Aspects think-tank, which closely watches OPEC policies, said she believed Riyadh would insist on better compliance by all members before agreeing to further cuts.

          Saudi Arabia has been cutting more than the amount agreed for most of this year. Its actual cut in November was 783,000 bpd, according to a Reuters survey, a level that was about 400,000 bpd more than its pledged cut of 322,000 bpd.

          Saudi and Russian oil production costs are much cheaper than those in the United States so any OPEC cut. A price rise can hurt OPEC and its allies because it bolsters U.S. production and allows U.S. shale oil producers to grab a bigger market share.

          “If WTI goes up to $60 per barrel, there will be more shale,” one of the sources familiar with OPEC talks said, warning against much steeper output cuts.

          Gary Ross, founder of BlackGold Investors, said it would make sense for Riyadh to support further cuts because of the Aramco IPO and because of forecasts for a oil surplus in 2020.

          Julius Baer’s Norbert Rucker said that “the most likely outcome next week is an extension of the supply deal for another six months, wrapped in flowery communication leaving the room open for further loose compliance and policy adjustments should market conditions change.”

          Additional reporting by Olesya Astakhova and Vladimir Soldatkin in Moscow; Writing by Dmitry Zhdannikov; Editing by Edmund Blair

           

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