Daily Archives: Sep 11, 2019

    SAN JUAN (Reuters) – A long-awaited plan to restructure Puerto Rico’s core government debt will finally be filed in court later this month, an attorney for the bankrupt U.S. commonwealth’s federally created financial oversight board told a federal judge on Wednesday.

    Martin Bienenstock said the latest delay was due to political turmoil on the island that led to last month’s resignation of Governor Ricardo Rossello, who was eventually replaced by Wanda Vazquez.

    He said while the board expected to file a plan in August, it held off because “it would have jammed” the new governor, who took office on Aug. 7.

    The board had signaled it could file a plan of adjustment covering roughly $13 billion of bonds and almost $50 billion of unfunded pension obligations as early as April, then set subsequent but vague deadlines in the following months.

    Puerto Rico entered bankruptcy in May 2017 to restructure $120 billion of debt and pension obligations.

    Bienenstock said “the relationship between the new government and the oversight board is positive.” Vazquez, who had been Puerto Rico’s justice secretary, has been meeting with oversight board officials. Her predecessor, Rossello, had been at odds with the board over spending priorities and other matters, including proposed pension cuts.

    Earlier this year, the board asked U.S. District Court Judge Laura Taylor Swain, who is hearing the island’s bankruptcy cases, to void billions of dollars of general obligation bonds. It also sued certain bondholders to recoup debt service payments and Wall Street banks and firms that participated in debt issuances.

    The board in June announced deals with some creditors over recovery rates for certain bonds and for a pension restructuring.

    In July, Swain ordered mediation that could extend into November over the validity of Puerto Rico’s GO and other bonds, as well as for other disputes.

    So far, Puerto Rico has won court approval for restructurings of debt from its Government Development Bank and Sales Tax Financing Corporation known as COFINA. On Monday, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority move closer to exiting bankruptcy when two holdout bond insurers joined a deal to restructure its debt.

    Reporting by Luis Valentin Ortiz in San Juan, additional reporting by Karen Pierog in Chicago; Editing by Matthew Lewis

     

      Buffalo Employment & Training Center (BETC)

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      Fall Career Fair! Thursday, September 12th, 2019 from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.

      At: John F. Kennedy Recreation Park located at 114 Hickory Street, Buffalo, NY 14204.
      *The inclement weather location will be inside the recreation center at the same location.

      The Employment fair is free for Job seekers to attend!
      -Hundreds of employment opportunities
      -On-site interviewing and hiring
      -Resume preparations
      -Educational, trade school opportunities

      CAREER FAIR RESPONSE

      POSITIONS

      Acara Solutions

      Lab Techs, HR Associate, Cleaners, Technical Document Processor

      Adecco Staffing

      Data Entry, Production/assembly, Warehouse, Packaging, AV Techs, Machine Operators

      Baker Victory Services

      Overnight Aides, Direct Support Professionals, Teacher Aides

      Bryant & Stratton College

      Education

      Buffalo and Erie County Library

      Page and Sr. Page

      Buffalo Sewer Authority

      Laborers, Millwrights and helpers, Sewer Construction Workers and Equipment Operators

      Buffalo Urban League

      Human Services

      Capital Management Service

      Call Center Positions (full or part time) Amherst & Buffalo

      Catholic Health

      HHA, CNA, Dietary Aide

      Center for Arts and Technology

      Training Programs

      Community Action Organization of WNY

      Teachers, youth Service Counselors, Maintenance associates and Activity Monitors

      Community Services for Every 1

      Direct Support Professionals

      Conserve

      Quality Service Associates, Debt Counselors, Call Center Reps

      Construction Exchange of Buffalo & WNY

      Various

      Erie 1 BOCES

      Training Programs

      FedEx Trade Networks

      Customs Trade Coordinator (all shifts)

      First Student

      School Bus Drivers

      GBUAHN

      Patient Health Navigator, Outreach-CHW, RN

      Geico

      Part time/Full time Customer Service and Sales

      GHR Traveling Nurses

      Nursing

      Home Depot

      Dept. Supervisors, Sales Associates, Freight asset protection, kitchen designer and more

      HR Partner Staffing

      Assembly, Machine operators, Trash collectors, Janitors production and more

      IQOR

      Customer Service and Collection Representatives

      Job Corps

      Education and Vocational Training

      Linacre, Inc.

      Medical Billing, Quality Assurance, Data Entry

      Manpower

      Production, Machinist, Maintenance, CNC Machinist, Forklift, Pickers and Packers & more

      MASIS Staffing Agency

      Production, Machinist, Maintenance, CNC Machinist, Forklift, Pickers and Packers & more

      NCAComp, Inc.

      Workers Compensation Assistants

      NFTA-Metro

      Bus Operators, Electronic Techs, Communication Techs and Electricians

      NYS AHEC System

      Program Specialist

      NYS Dept. of Labor

      Job Search Assistance

      Primerica

      Customer Service, Data Entry, Asst. Managers

      Reliant Capital Solutions

      Collections Contact Specialist (federal student loans)

      Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

      Nursing, Lab Tech, Physicians, Secretary

      Seneca Buffalo Creek Casino

      Dealers, Security, Valet, Cashier, Cleaning, Shuttle, Restaurant and More

      Strictly Business Safety Solutions

      Certified CPR/AED and First Aid Instructors

      The Green Fields Continuing Care

      Dietary Aides, Cooks, Housekeepers, HHA, PCA, CAN, LPN and RN

      United Healthcare

      Customer Service

      US Census Bureau

      Office Workers and Census field Workers

      Wellcare Health Plans

      Benefit Consultant

      WNY Jobs

      All Industries and Skill Levels Advertised

      CDC’s Newly Released Viral Hepatitis Surveillance Report Shows Continued Rise in Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C Infections

      Washington, DC, September 10, 2019 — Today, the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), representing the nation’s nearly 3,000 local governmental health departments, released the following statement in response to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) newly released 2017 Annual Viral Hepatitis Surveillance Report. The report  reveals that  rates of acute hepatitis A (HAV), hepatitis B (HBV), and hepatitis C (HCV) infection in the U.S. continue to rise.

      “The new report highlights the impact that viral hepatitis is having on communities across the country and underscores the need for investments in local health departments to implement and continue effective public health interventions to prevent and treat viral hepatitis,” said Lori Tremmel Freeman, NACCHO’s Chief Executive Officer.  “These efforts, along with critical work of community, state and local partners, is needed to address the spread and the numerous factors that contribute to these rising rates.  Failure to collaboratively act on these data will have significant consequences for our communities.”

      According to the new report, cases of HAV jumped nearly 70 percent from 2016 to 2017, an increase largely attributable to person-to-person outbreaks among people experiencing homelessness and people who inject drugs. HBV rates among persons aged 40-49 years are the highest in 15 years, partly due to lack of vaccine protection in recommended populations, and factors such as injection drug use and multiple sex partners compound the risk in older age groups. HCV infections have more than tripled since 2010 and the number of new cases is likely much higher but inestimable due to limited testing and underreporting. Large outbreaks of HCV have occurred predominantly among younger adults, primarily as a result of increasing injection drug use associated with America’s ongoing opioid crisis.

      As community providers of health education and services, local health departments are on the front lines and play a vital role in addressing hepatitis through vaccination; testing and treatment; linkage to care; surveillance and outbreak response; and elimination strategy planning. However, addressing and reversing these trends will require a collaborative effort among health providers at every level. Coordinated engagement among local, state, federal, and national stakeholders is needed to develop partnerships that increase access to vulnerable, hard-to-reach populations and successfully implement effective, community-based, prevention and treatment strategies, including:

      • Expansion of hepatitis screening and linkage to care services;
      • Increased access to vaccines, especially for recommended at-risk populations;
      • Implementation of syringe services programs; and
      • Eradication of treatment barriers for people living with hepatitis.

      Together, these strategies will help decrease transmission of HAV, HBV, and HCV, and increase treatment availability, which will save lives and money and decrease the burden on the nation’s health system.

      NACCHO is committed to supporting local public health efforts and has developed several resources to build the capacity of local health departments to address viral hepatitis:

      About NACCHO
      The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) represents the nation’s nearly 3,000 local governmental health departments. These city, county, metropolitan, district, and tribal departments work every day to protect and promote health and well-being for all people in their communities. For more information about NACCHO, please visit www.naccho.org.

      The story of Hispanic Americans stretches from coast to coast and across 500 years of history. The Spanish first arrived in Florida long before the pilgrims and the settled in California. Long before California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Wyoming, Colorado, Oklahoma and Kansas were part of the United States, it was Mexico.

      But the history of the United States, as most of us learned it, still begins with Jamestown, Plymouth Rock and the Pilgrims.

      “We tend to think of the United States as an English thing,” says Ray Suarez, who wrote the companion book to “Latino Americans,” a six-part, three-night documentary series beginning Tuesday on PBS. “But this is a case of three empires, Spain, France and Britain, that went charging into this new territory, elbows out, bumping into one another and jostling for dominance.”

      In fact, Suarez reminds us, “The first American settlement in 1565 in St. Augustine, Fla., predates Jamestown, and Spanish was the first language spoken in what became the United States. So, Latinos are the newest immigrants to the United States and also the oldest inhabitants.”

      Suarez, chief national correspondent for PBS’ “NewsHour,” admits that covering the entire history of Latino Americans in just six hours or 256 pages is “a lot to tackle. It’s a big bite of history, and there’s a lot to stuff into each hour. But I think the series handles that in a way that’s both interesting and coherent, and I hope the book supports that.”

      The series and book are structured chronologically, beginning with the earliest history of the Americas. But each episode or chapter also singles out characters (sometimes depicted in dramatizations)

      Through whom the story comes alive.

      We meet Apolinaria Lorenzana, who as a child is snatched from Mexico and grows old as an important figure in the Spanish Missions.

      Juan Seguin, both Texan and Mexican, fights at the Alamo on the American side, next to Davy Crockett. Moving along, in World War II, Macario Garcia becomes the first Mexican National to earn the Congressional Medal of Honor. Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta march for the rights of migrant workers in the 1970s.

      Hispanics service to the United States Military can be traced back to the Civil war. Records of Hispanics in the armed forces were not kept until the 1970s, according to the Pew Center for Latino Studies. While some records show that thousands of Hispanic American men — Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans for instance — fought in the Civil War as well as the two World Wars, researchers have determined that many more served and died than official documents show. As a result of the omission, the full story of Hispanic sacrifice may never be fully told. And that is a shame, since Latinos have been part of the building of America — including dying while protecting it — for hundreds of years. If the records don’t show that Hispanics served and died, that we toiled in the trenches and contributed with blood, how does our nation measure Hispanic contributions, let one acknowledge them?

      In the new American conversation, cultural celebrations like these matter, and they matter greatly. They help us better explain our Hispanic story to each other and ourselves; they matter for the individual and national psyche, because they allow the 50 million-plus Hispanics, and the larger American family, to better appreciate the Hispanic story within the greater American narrative.

      Why is this important to know? By 2050, almost one in three people in the United States will be Latino, a total of more than 130 million, Suarez writes, citing a Pew Hispanic Center projection. Pew also expects the Hispanic population to triple between 2005 and 2050.

      As immigration remains a divisive issue, the vision of the United States as a melting pot is different today, Suarez says.

      “Our ideas of what becoming American means have changed. The old idea was that we gave up everything we were. In the middle of the 20th century, it wasn’t uncommon for grandparents to talk

      to parents in the old language to exclude the children, because they didn’t want the children ever to speak that language.”

      Now, the children or grandchildren of immigrants may want to be 100 percent American, or they may want to celebrate their roots and their family history, he says. “It’s up to them. For young Latino Americans, Spanish and English can exist side by side, as two living tongues.”

      Suarez’s family came from Puerto Rico in the 1930s, escaping terrible poverty during the Depression, and more followed in the 1950s, when migration was encouraged by both the governments of Puerto Rico and the United States. He was born in New York, the first in the family born on the mainland, and grew up in Brooklyn, “confident that I was Puerto Rican and proud of it.”

      Now, his own three kids speak Spanish “from very well to hardly at all,” Suarez says. “It’s been interesting watching them construct their own identity. Their mom isn’t Puerto Rican, so they are figuring out who they are and where they fit.”

      By: Gail Pennington

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