Daily Archives: Aug 18, 2019

    The West Side nonprofit that transformed long-vacant School 77 into community space and senior apartments is seeking neighbors’ input for a series of ambitious new housing developments.

    Preliminary proposals for the PUSH Buffalo projects, which have no concrete timeline or budget yet, call for 10 doubles, two mixed-use buildings and two apartment buildings clustered near the intersections of Plymouth and Massachusetts avenues and West Delavan Avenue and Grant Street.

    But the ultimate scope will depend on community input, which PUSH is currently soliciting through in-person meetings and an online form, said deputy director Harper Bishop.

    “The people closest to the problems have the best solutions,” Bishop said. “We take that very seriously … We always want people to feel a sense of ownership.”

    PUSH’s early plans – which are subject to change, Bishop cautioned – call for 50 affordable housing units and two commercial storefronts located on 12 parcels of land PUSH already owns. The organization will prioritize green and net-zero technologies, Bishop said. It also plans to earmark, in collaboration with BestSelf Behavioral Health, 15 units for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

    The fledgling project represents the latest phase of PUSH’s 11-year quest to expand affordable and sustainable housing options on the West Side, where it owns 69 properties, plus additional vacant lots, in a 30-block focus area. In March, PUSH and a fellow West Side nonprofit organization, the WASH Project Laundromat and Cultural Arts Center, broke ground on a $2.3 million renovation slated to transform a vacant, fire-damaged building into nine affordable housing units and ground-floor space for the WASH Project.

     

    PUSH’s portfolio also includes the newly renovated School 77, which houses the group’s offices and shared community and arts space, as well as 30 affordable senior apartments priced between $284 and $575 per month. Rent in PUSH-owned apartments generally ranges from $350 to $625 per month.

    Such rents are increasingly unusual on the appreciating West Side, where average monthly rents in some areas have spiked as high as $900, according to the real estate site Zillow. Affordability was a top concern at an initial Aug. 1 community meeting for the project, Bishop said, as were parking, sustainability and utility costs.

    The organization will gather more community feedback at a second meeting, scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Aug. 31. PUSH is also soliciting input on its website, and will consider neighbors’ comments before finalizing a formal proposal.

    “We’ve already received a lot of comments,” Bishop said. “We want to know what people want to see in the neighborhood.”

    LEGAL NOTICE

    8/21/2019

    TOWN OF HAMBURG

    DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

    “ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDDERS”

    Sealed Bids Are Hereby Requested For Project 2019 – 01: “Infrastructure Reconstruction”

    all in accordance with specifications on file with the Hamburg Town Clerk’s Office, Hamburg Town Hall, 6100 South Park Avenue, Hamburg, New York 14075. Said specifications may be obtained from the Hamburg Town Clerk during regular business hours, Monday through Friday; 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (One (1) “Bid Package” may be collected at no charge. Additional “Bid Packages” can be purchased for $50.00 each. Funds paid for additional Bid Packages will NOT be returned. Checks for additional Bid Packages should be made payable to the: “Hamburg Town Clerk”.

    Said bids will be publicly opened and read aloud in the Hamburg Town Hall conference room at 11:00 a.m. local time (according to the clock within Hamburg Town Clerk’s Office) on Wednesday, September 18, 2019 and thereafter considered by the Town of Hamburg. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond in the minimum amount equal to the contract award. Attention is called to the fact that Community Development Funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development are being used to reconstruct approximately 340 linear feet of road within the Village of Blasdell. Due to the use of federal CDBG funds, compliance with Title VI and other applicable provisions of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Executive Order 11246 (Buffalo Plan); Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 as amended; Section 109 of Order 11625 (Utilization of Minority Business Enterprises); Davis-Bacon and Related Acts is required. “The Town reserves the right to reject all bids and to waive any informalities.”

    Sealed Bids Must Be Marked:

    “2019 INFRASTRUCTURE RECONSTRUCTION”

    Dated: August 21, 2019

    Catherine Rybczynski; Town Clerk

    Town of Hamburg

      Buffalo, NY — It was a day filled with pride for the Puerto Rican & Hispanic community in the city, as thousands of people attended the Puerto Rican & Hispanic Day Parade and Festival to celebrate their heritage and Diversity.

      The festival kicked off with its 17thAnnual parade with hundreds of colorful floats, Thousands of people dancing and celebrating as they slowly made their way along Avenida San Juan, draped in their counties flags with music playing from the musicians on the floats.

      Participants waved to those watching from sidewalks, and tossed out pieces of candy for children to grab, showing big smiles despite the unbearable heat.

      Nearly every parade goer could be seen sporting clothing with his or her counties native colors.

      Buffalo resident Dee Santos was dressed in a festive dress she got from Puerto Rico, accompanied by red, white and blue flowers tightly tucked into her hair. Her outfit matched her enthusiasm about the day.

      “This is my soul,” she said. “This is my heart.”

      Santos is proudly 100% Puerto Rican, and moved to the U.S. in the ’80s. She characterized herself as a community leader who represents and supports people from all backgrounds.

      “I will always represent when other people are celebrating. I’m there to support them,” she said.

      Santos’ favorite part of the parade — aside from the music that kept her dancing through its entirety — was the sense of unity from everyone coming together and sharing the same reason to celebrate.

      Hosted by The Puerto Rican & Hispanic Day Parade, the day was about moving forward “PALANTE”, culture and contributions, said committee member Yolanda Martinez. In talking about the importance of the day, Martinez touched on the history of Puerto Rico and the U.S.

      A complicated background with the country they now call home, the former Spanish territory finally got a legal standing in the U.S. system in 1917. That of course followed the Spanish-American War, when the U.S. invaded Puerto Rico; and the Treaty of Paris in 1898, when the war ended and Spain ceded the territory to the U.S.

      Just before the United States entered World War I, Puerto Ricans were granted citizenship to the U.S.

      Now, Puerto Ricans in Buffalo are celebrating how far they have come, and how much they have contributed to America. From sports, to art, and large numbers in the armed forces, Martinez said they have given a lot to the country they are glad to be a part of.

      She said the day is not political, but about “happily celebrating heritage, culture and diversity.

      As the parade neared its end, attendees gathered in LaSalle Park to continue the celebration with food, drinks and live music.

      Festivities continue until Sunday evening.

      STAY CONNECTED

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