Daily Archives: Aug 21, 2017

Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Ohio State’s College of Engineering have developed a new technology, Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), that can generate any cell type of interest for treatment within the patient’s own body. This technology may be used to repair injured tissue or restore function of aging tissue, including organs, blood vessels and nerve cells.

Results of the regenerative medicine study published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

“By using our novel nanochip technology, injured or compromised organs can be replaced. We have shown that skin is a fertile land where we can grow the elements of any organ that is declining,” said Dr. Chandan Sen, director of Ohio State’s Center for Regenerative Medicine & Cell Based Therapies, who co-led the study with L. James Lee, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering with Ohio State’s College of Engineering in collaboration with Ohio State’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

Researchers studied mice and pigs in these experiments. In the study, researchers were able to reprogram skin cells to become vascular cells in badly injured legs that lacked blood flow. Within one week, active blood vessels appeared in the injured leg, and by the second week, the leg was saved. In lab tests, this technology was also shown to reprogram skin cells in the live body into nerve cells that were injected into brain-injured mice to help them recover from stroke.

“This is difficult to imagine, but it is achievable, successfully working about 98 percent of the time. With this technology, we can convert skin cells into elements of any organ with just one touch. This process only takes less than a second and is non-invasive, and then you’re off. The chip does not stay with you, and the reprogramming of the cell starts. Our technology keeps the cells in the body under immune surveillance, so immune suppression is not necessary,” said Sen, who also is executive director of Ohio State’s Comprehensive Wound Center.

TNT technology has two major components: First is a nanotechnology-based chip designed to deliver cargo to adult cells in the live body. Second is the design of specific biological cargo for cell conversion. This cargo, when delivered using the chip, converts an adult cell from one type to another, said first author Daniel Gallego-Perez, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and general surgery who also was a postdoctoral researcher in both Sen’s and Lee’s laboratories.

TNT doesn’t require any laboratory-based procedures and may be implemented at the point of care. The procedure is also non-invasive. The cargo is delivered by zapping the device with a small electrical charge that’s barely felt by the patient.

“The concept is very simple,” Lee said. “As a matter of fact, we were even surprised how it worked so well. In my lab, we have ongoing research trying to understand the mechanism and do even better. So, this is the beginning, more to come.”

Researchers plan to start clinical trials next year to test this technology in humans, Sen said.

Funding for this research was provided by Leslie and Abigail Wexner, Ohio State’s Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cell-Based Therapies and Ohio State’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMQ51Kj2tS0

giveaway
christiancasillasproductions

Christian Casillas Productions would like to give back to the Hispanic community and readers of the Panorama Hispano News by providing 4 families with a free outdoor photo session in September 2017 . The session will include 10-15 professionally edited images, along with a custom online gallery and app for Android and iOS to showcase your stunning session.

Canisius College presents from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Marie Maday Theatre located in Lyons Hall. The event, which features Saranaide, is co-sponsored by the Friends of Hispanic Arts (FOHA), MexiCanisius and the Latin American Studies Department.

Description: Sara Rodriguez, also known as Saranaide, will present songs by Latin American artists and genres that have influenced Sara as a singer-songwriter. In this intimate performance, Saranaide creates an evening that intertwines songs with stories that shares with the audience the inner workings of this artist and her life journey.

Saranaide is a born and raised Buffalo musician. With a self-titled EP released in September 2016, Saranaide has been bringing the soulful grooves. Inspired and influenced by soul, reggae, jazz and world music, Sara brings a sound that is sure to delight all audiences. Along with performing with her own band, she also can be seen with the Buffalo Afrobeat Orchestra and Preach Freedom and Connect.

Admission is $10 for general admission; students are free with a valid ID. Tickets will be available on the day of the event at the entrance of the Marie Maday Theatre.

Contact details: For more information on Canciones and other upcoming FOHA events, visit

Friends of Hispanic Arts on Facebook, or contact Sara Rodriguez at saranaidemusic@gmail.com.

 

Friends of Hispanic Arts Inc. (FOHA) presents Poetas, a poetry reading, at D’Youville College on Tuesday September 19th at 7PM in Madonna Hall.  The night features as its readers Olga Karman and Jorge Guitart, two nationally acclaimed local poets.  The event is co-sponsored by D’Youville College’s Liberal Arts Department and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.  Friends of Hispanic Arts (FOHA) is a local, not for profit organization dedicated to the promotion of events that center on Hispanic culture and the arts within the community.

   Jorge Guitart

Description: Poetas is a night dedicated to the poetry of two esteemed Buffalo professors, Dr. Olga Karman and Dr. Jorge Guitart.  FOHA President Mr. Emilio Fuentes expects this event will be part of a new series of events dedicated to the written word.  Additionally, for this fall, FOHA has three musical events planned: Sara Rodríguez on September 16th  and Michael Mendoza on November 11th both at Canisius College’s Maday Theater, and LATINAS November 14th at the Kavinoky Theater.

Olga Karman was born in Cuba, where she lived until she was twenty years old. Her teenage years in Havana coincided with Fidel Castro’s revolution and rise to power. Olga left Cuba in 1960 and lived in North Stonington, a rural, isolated part of Connecticut where she felt her exile in a most painful way.  She resumed the college education she had begun in Havana at nearby Connecticut College for Women, and when she graduated in 1966 she held a Woodrow Wilson fellowship for graduate school and acceptance from Yale and Harvard Universities.  Olga moved to Buffalo in 1976, taught briefly at Nichols School, and in 1980 she accepted a position at D’Youville College, where she taught until she retired in 2007.  She looks forward to reading her work at the college, which still feels like her home.  Olga’s writing career spans poetry, short fiction, and her memoir Scatter My Ashes Over Havana.

Jorge Guitart was born in Havana, Cuba, in 1937, and early on he decided that his favorite subjects in school were Spanish grammar and English. They continue to be central to his intellectual life. In 1962, not wanting to live any longer under a Leninist dictatorship, he moved to the United States.  In the mid-sixties he began to write poetry in English as well as in Spanish. Guitart’s first collection of poetry in English was Foreigner’s Notebook (Shuffaloff 1993), and in 1996 his long cyclical poem Film Blanc was published as a chapbook by Meow Press. His latest book of poems is The Empress of Frozen Custard and Ninety-Nine Other Poems, published by BlazeVOX in 2009.  He obtained a Ph.D. in Spanish linguistics from Georgetown University in 1973 and that year he started teaching at the State University of New York at Buffalo, where he is now Professor of Spanish Linguistics in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.

Contact details:  Admission is free.  For more information on Poetas and other upcoming FOHA events, visit Friends of Hispanic Arts on Facebook, or contact Paola Kersch at (716) 517-5168 or kerschp@dyc.edu.

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